Columbia & Snake Rivers Wildlife

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Pronghorn antelope

Just behind the cheetah, the pronghorn antelope is the second fastest animal in the world, clocking up to 65 miles per hour. But unlike the cheetah, it can run for hours at top speeds. Within North America, the pronghorn antelope is the fastest hoofed animal. When they run they keep their mouths open to take in extra oxygen. But, pronghorn antelope aren’t good jumpers. They go under, rather than jumping, fences. When leaping across grasslands the antelope become startled, they raise the white hair on their behinds, signaling any danger to other antelope up to two miles away.

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Bighorn Sheep

You’ll recognize them by their horns. Males’, or rams, horns weigh up to 30 pounds and curl around their faces. Females, or ewes, have smaller horns curving to a sharp point. Males battle each other to mate with particular females, rearing on their hind legs and charging at up to 20 miles per hour. These confrontations can last for hours and be heard as the clashing of horns echoes through canyons.

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Mountain Goats

How do they stay balanced on the tippy top of a rock? It’s the expert design of their hooves that makes mountain goats such nimble climbers. They have broad hooves with straight outer parts and soft flexible inner pads for easing gripping. The soft pads of their two toes can form around a rock while the outer parts lock them into place and help them stay balanced. It’s nature’s perfect hiking boot!